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that is fully paid for. it is split between defense and non-defense and it presents additional investments in things like education, research, and manufacturing. building on the model established in ryan-murray, it is paid for with spending cut and tax reforms. it is deficit neutral. supporting what the president said in the state of the union, there is a series of programs to create jobs. it lays out $302 billion infrastructure proposal that is paid for with pro-growth tax. it strengthens the manufacture base and supports groundbreaking research to fight disease, protect the environment and develop new technology. it enhances the administration's management efforts to deliver a government that is more efficient and supportive of economic growth. and it will expand opportunity for all-americans. it doubles the maximum value of the earned income tax credit to encourage people to enter the workforce. and makes high quality preschool available to every four year old. and drive workforce training. it will focus on the primary drivers of long term debt and deficits. it builds on the forms of th
him several more times in the chest. as officer faulkner lay dying in the streets defensely, abu-jamal shot him in the face, killing him. at the hornghts abu-jamal brag -- at the hospital, abu-jamal bragged that he had shot officer faulkner and expressed his hope that he would die. at trial, he was remorseless. he interrupted the proceedings and insulted the judge and even smirked at officer faulkner's widow when the bloodstained shirt was held up in court as evidence. four eyewitnesses saw abu-jamal gun down officer faulkner, four eyewitnesses. three more witnesses at the hospital heard him confess to the crime. ballistics evidence approved that officer faulkner had been shot with a handgun registered to abu-jamal, which was found at the scene of the murder along with the shell casings. based on this overwhelming evidence, abu-jamal was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death. what followed was a 30-year effort by the far left to glorify abu-jamal and to exonerate him. this effort was taken up by law professors, left-wing activistes, and in 2009 by the organization which the no
that government investment and flood defenses has fallen. in the light of this an event we have seen, does the prime minister think it's right to revisit the plan for investment and flood defense? >> we will look very carefully at the plan for flood defenses but, of course, without spending figures all the way out to 2020, not all of which are fully committed which are major investments in budget defenses but i said two weeks ago as the waters reside and as a bea and others can look at what happened, we can review and see what new measures might be necessary. let me just repeat the point that in his four-year period and, indeed, in this parliament overall spending on flood defense has gone up. >> mr. speaker, i'm afraid the figures the primus is quoting are phony and i believe he knows this. [shouting] this is what the uk -- this is what the uk statistical process i know they don't want to hear. they say this, government funding for flood defenses were lower in both nominal and real terms during the current period than since the last. the only way you claim otherwise is by ignoring inflati
minister david cameron answered questions wednesday on funding for flood defense, unemployment and cuts to the u.k.'s defense programs. from london, this is just over 30 minutes. >> questions for the prime minister. >> question number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. >> this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and according to my duties, i shall have further such meetings later today. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i think we should also congratulate on his tremendous win in that winter olympics. it was announced a bonuses of 2.3 billion pounds. 140% pay rise for the chief executive. when ordinary families face a cost-of-living crisis. isn't it time for this government to listen to labor to get our young people back to work? >> i congratulate the olympic team for the best metal performance since 1924 at a winter's game. it was a huge honor to welcome them. we had an explanation of the task of the skeleton bobsledding and indeed curling. congratulation goes to everyone involved and all those who helped to train them. on the issue of bank bonuses -- they are well do
story broke just after secretary of defense hagel had announced plans to scale back the american military. we're going to pick up the interview. i want to talk to you about the military budget that you outlined. you want to reduce the size of th army to the smallest size since before world war ii. how do you reduce the size of the american military without making it look like, to the people around the world, that we're somehow retreating, that we're withdrawing from all of this. >> you start, bob, with the reality of where we are in the world today. this budget that is the first budget in 12 years that's not a budget based on war footing. we've been at war for 1 years constantly. two wars. we're out of one war, iraq. and we're coming out of the longest war we've ever been, afghanistan. not unlike after every war the united states has been in, you reset your posture. you reset your assets. you reset your whole enterprise based on the new realities and based on preparing that institution for the challenges of the future. to answer your question, how do you adjust to the dangerous c
. between the department of defense and the va and i know we're in the process of tearing that down. we're one family. when you take that oath and say i'm going to serve this country, it should go right on through. there shouldn't be this wall and this divide between the opportunities that exist to take care of our troops. electronic medical records that he spoke about, to me that is a shame and delays care, makes it more difficult to have a smooth flow of care. i do see positive things. i was at base luis mccord last year and seen start upprograms where they are focusing on transition at the time of ets. and it makes sense to me if you are disabled, getting a medical separation that your level of disability can be determined at that time and carry over into the va. instead of having to go through these processes and having redone the services. there's other things i see starting to take place and that's guiding as they are leaving the military into being able to use the skills they learned in the military and translate them into civilian work and helping them get there and guidance on
this afternoon is dr. james jay carafano, vice president of foreign and defense policy studies. he is our richardson fell and also directs the kathryn and shelby david institute for international study. he also serves as a senior fellow at the george washington university homeland security policy institute, serves on the board of trustees for the marine corps university foundation, on the advisory board for the west point center of or history, the hambleton society and operation renewed hope foundation. is an agenda professor at georgetown university and the institute of world politics and to serve as a visiting professor at the national defense university as well as georgetown university. he has written several books, the most recent being his co-authoring of a textbook on homeland security and, of course, he co-authored for heritage, our book on winning the long war, lessons from the cold war for defending terrorism and preserving freedom. lease join me in welcoming jim carafano. [applause] >> thank you. i'm going to be extremely brief so we can get right to the top of. i want to start
investors, and help restructure the economy. the defense budget has seen double digit growth almost every year since 1989, and that will continue. this year's defense spending will increase by more than 12% to about $130 billion. li said the government will do more to address concerns about pollution, and the wealth gap. >> translator: air, water and soil pollution is severe in some places. and the task of conserving energy and reducing emissions remains arduous. >> reporter: and he promised the government will severely punish public servants and others involved in corruption. after the session we asked some delegates about li's report. >> translator: i think the campaign against corruption should be more tightened up. it's also set out in report. only in doing so the government could do its own duty. >> this i think is a basement, there will be some problem. so we need to do things step by step. >> let's now talk more about the government work report. nhk world kyoko fujita spent the day going through it. let's start by talking about the 7.5% economic growth target. what's behind the dec
. no, we don't need missile defense shield. putin has the eu, a feckless eu abandoned defense budgets for the welfare state. how is the president going to rally the eu, which was a big point yesterday on the show. when we have the french sending vessels over to help the russian navy and the germans have shown no appetite to get involved. president obama has no cards to play. >> those mid-range weapons in europe were introduced by harold brown and jimmy carter in 1978 and 1979. you're right about the french, the feckless eu. >> at least carter canceled the olympics. president obama doesn't even have the guts to do that. he canceled, whaultd, the paralympics? >> i think it's a difficult position because they need this energy that russia gives them because there's no other way to give them. >> god forbid we would want to piss off the environmentalists. >> i'm not needed here. that was my point. a good point. so, okay, amazingly, bob turned this into a question of what is happening today to what did reagan accomplish? that was five minutes spent rehashing that. i'll also say one thing abo
. strengthen nato's defense posture and impose costs on the putin government. broadly these are objectives most americans want to achieve right now but this particular circumstance i believe presents president obama with a fairly stark choice. ad-libbing was the term kim used. i would describe it as muddling through. he can either seek to mutt dell through this crisis or use it to articulate a broader vision of the role the united states should be playing and what we should be achieving through global leadership at this time. this is important because the russian invasion ever the crimean peninsula, is in my view symptommic of a role in which we see growing pressure against our allies, security partners, our friend in many areas and many regions simultaneously. would compare this moment perhaps to, once again kim mentioned the example of president carter facing the soviet invasion of afghanistan. would compare it both to perhaps president truman in 1947 looking at turkey straits crisis which was a very specific circumstance to which there were specific measures taken in terms of u.s. military a
served since 2002, also focusing on afghanistan. 2013, he has served as the secretary of defense for afghanistan, pakistan and central asia with the assistant secretary of self-defense. prior to this he was deputy assistant secretary of defense for east asia, and then he also served as the dcm at the u.s. embassy in beijing. and last, but not least, it is a pleasure to welcome back an old friend and former u.s. ip colleague. from june 2010 to june 2013, alex thier served for afghanistan and pakistan affairs. before joining u.s. aa, he served here at u.s. ip is a senior advisor and director for afghanistan and pakistan from -- for 2005 and 2010. from 2002 to 2004, he served as an advisor in kabul and also in the 1990's worked in afghanistan for the you and -- . r the un with that i will turn it over to you, mr. grossman. then we will have some time for question and answers. >> thank you very much. let me say thanks to all the organizers of this event and what an honor it is to be on this panel. having served as a special representative, i know what this is about. if you will allow
said the government investment in flood defenses -- in the likes of this, does the prime minister think it is right to revisit the plan for investment in flood defense? >> we will look carefully at the plans. we have set out spending figures all the way out through 2020, not all of which are fully committed. i said two weeks ago as the waters reside and has that ea and others can look at what happened, we can review and see what you measures might be necessary. let me repeat the point that this four year period in this parliament, overall spending has gone up. i'm afraid that figures he is quoting is phony and i believe he meant it. this is why that u.k. statistical authority -- they say this -- government-funded for flood defenses is nominal and real terms during the current spending periods. the only way to claim otherwise is ignoring inflation and claiming credit that others spend. why won't the administrator admit it? he has been called out. you look at 2010 when i became prime minister through 2014, the spending has been 2.4 billion more than the 2.2 billion in the previous four ye
the russian troops adopted what they would see entirely as defensive positions and having their photographs taken with pro-russian local and smoking cigarettes in many places and have not had clips loaded on their guns and they have been, i think, at pains to point out they don't want to be seen as an aggressive force equally. by the same token the body language and symbolism from the ukraine troops this morning was equally passive and one was a soviet flag from the second world war saying they fought against fascism but are no longer but carried a ukraine flag and the implication of that is they want to be see potentially being on the russian side but won't surrender and will not swear allegiance to the flag and there is not resistance going on but a sense of defiance as well. >> reporter: lawrence, thanks for keeping us up to date with the events in crimea and we will keep a close eye on things there. russia appears to be moving more military assets to the region and russian war ships passed through in istambul and saying they may go to ukraine and they are in ukraine by a lesser sense o
the case in arizona, businesses to use religion as a defense in a private lawsuit. so to give you an example of how that might play out, you know, let's say you live in a state where it's illegal to fire someone because they're gay. now, if one of these bills passes, that company could turn around and say, oh, hey, i think homosexuality is a sin, therefore i'm going to fire you and i don't need to abide by this law. so, you know, that lawsuit provision is a big deal. >> i know in some of the cases, in some of the states where they've been considering this, the lawsuit provision works in such a way not only can you not sue somebody for discriminating against you, but if you do, you have to pay their legal fees as well as your own so it's almost a punishment for even complaining about being discriminated against. it's fascinating stuff and fast-moves story. dana lieblson, reporter for "mother jones." nice to see you. >> thanks for having any. >>> the federal prosecutor's investigation of the george washington bridge scandal in chris christie's new jersey has taken a turn today. we'v
. the largest are in the defense department. they are in the news a lot. the national space intelligence agency where i work for a couple of years i'd want to take pictures from the satellites. the defense intelligence agency. obviously, intelligence matters. and the national reconnaissance office that launches and manages the satellites. people think the satellites are just up there. no fee. you fly a satellite -- no. you fly a satellite and determine where it will be here that is what the nro does. very valuable role. the fbi and the department of homeland security are both concerned with threats and terrorist organizations and other things that could threaten the u.s. the work with state and local governments. the treasury department is concerned with financial intelligence. you have the drug enforcement agency. department, which is where my security concerns currently reside. it looks after nuclear matters and energy matters. we also have each of the five armed forces has his own intelligence branch. you put all of that together. it comes to 16. -- weoblem with the silos learned from 9/11 t
in the united states coming to the defense of gay and lesbian citizens. to finally be written in to full citizenship in this country. lgbt people. is, you know, literally not something i thought i would see in my lifetime. really. i'm gratifiedfy it and i am thrilled that you've seen attorney generals in virginia, now new mexico, refuse to defend. they're clearly unconstitutional anti-gay marriage bans. there's one other thing i wanted to note about arizona and its law. it's currently not illegal in arizona to discriminate against people based on their sexual orientation. right now people can be fired in arizona or denied services or thrown out of their apartments for being gay, lesbian, bi, or transgendered. so this law not only was completely unnecessary, but the vetoing of this law isn't going to protect lgbt people in arizona who are currently facing anti-queer discrimination. >> i mean, look, that's such an important point. you can cast this as in some ways a hopeful sign because as we're reporting the incredible united backlash to something bad. it's a long ways from full equality
abandoned our missile defense agreements with them to protect europe from a rogue missile coming out of the mideast. russia backed obama down. if i were president obama, i would re-engage poland and the czech republic regarding missile defense. i would admit georgia to nato. i'd have a larger military presence in the balkans to nato members who are threatened by russia. i would fly the nato flag as strongly as i could around putin. i would suspend his membership in the g-8. become the g-7. the g-20 would become the g-19 at least for a year. every day he stays in the ukraine i would add to it. >> senator durbin, first to the question of why would putin care about this condemnation? he is much more interested in crimea than he is about what the united states thinks about him. >> candy, vladimir putin and the russians just spent $50 billion on this sochi charm offensive to try to redefine russia in the 21st century. that sochi charm offensive died on the streets of sevastopol. when he moved in thousands of troops days after the closing ceremony. he is trying to have it both ways. he wan
with defense cuts and no entitlement reforms. >> it makes no effort to address the drivers of our debt and deficit. >> we'll sit down with leaders of the congressional budget the committee, senator rob portman and congressman chris van hollen. plus arizona governor jan brewer vetoes a bill that would protect religious freedom over gay rights. but other states may take up similar measures. our sunday panel weighs in. and our power players of the week. they are making the please don't touch signs at museums a past. all right now on fox "fox news sunda sunday". hello again from fox news in washington. we begin with a fast moving developments in ukraine. president obama spoke with russian president putin and said the u.s. will suspend planning for the g-8 summit in sochi this summer. putin got approval from the russian parliament to send troops into ukraine. and the russians have seized control of the crimean peninsula without firing a shot. ukraine's government says we are on the brink of disaster. and is asking the u.s. and europe for help. let's get the latest now from fox news national
we love to hate russia? is it deserved? oscar pistorius's defense hammers a witness. she cries sayinging it was awful to hear the shots. what we know about the night of the killing. >>> the crisis in ukraine. vladimir putin will do next. joining me now is robert legvald and general mark kimmet and fareed zakaria. fareed, we spoke last night and had a fascinating debate about the state of play. i want to play you a clip. this is president clinton talking to me at the cgi last september about his own dealings with vladimir putin because it seems to me that trust in putin right now is absolutely key. listen to this. >> mr. putin has got -- he's very smart. >> you know him better than most people. >> yeah, i do. >> what was he like behind closed doors away from sort of the public utterances? >> smart and remarkably -- we had a really good, blunt relationship. >> how blunt? >> brutally blunt. >> did putin ever renege on a personal agreement made to you? >> no, he did not. >> behind closed doors he could be trusted. >> he kept his word in all the deals we made. >> i found that fascin
by russia's defense minister who said it has nothing to do with ukraine. it's russia's forces going through an u unannounced test, basically making sure that the army, the navy, and the air force can react to any perceived threats as quickly as they should be able to. now they did say that the black sea fleet, which is based in crimea in ukraine is being adequately protected, and the fleet is being bumped up a bit, which is probably what you would expect for any country with overseas military assets near a country going through a revolution at the moment. although they have said that the military drills have nothing to do with what is going on in ukraine, there are probably people who are very high up in the defense ministry and russian government as well who are thinking that reminding russia's neighbors and it's rivals of russian military might at a time when it's influence in central and eastern europe has taken a big dent recently is certainly no bad to do from a russian geopolitical perspective. >> getlet's go to tim friend who has the latest from kiev. we understand that it's a novel
's defense ministry, is part of the military drills that were began yesterday. nothing to do with what is going on in ukraine, according to the russian government. that is clearly not believed by the ukrainian interim government, which is concerned about the penalty of russian aggression. so concerned that it has warned russia that a movement of its fleet, based in crimea, would be seen by the ukrainian interim government as a sign of aggression, and the ukrainian foreign ministry summoned the russian-charged affair for immediate emergency consultation. russia at the moment does not have an ambassador in kiev because he was recalled to moscow. this is a signal of how tense things are at the moment. >> it must be tense because, as we well know, ukraine is absolutely vital to president putin - not just historically, but geopolitically as well. how does moscow regard what is happening in ukraine now, and keeping a close eye on crimea? >> yes, well it's not just the geopolitical importance of ukraine to russia that matters, it's the emotional importance. we have spoken to russians on the s
that this committee questioned the department of defense officials on the full spectrum of the mission to include extremely sensitive and highly classified information. in an effort to fully understand the events pertaining to the strategy that unfolded that day, we have tried our best to treat all the families' interests equally, knowing that there's a wide range of spectrum and perspectives given the sheer number of people and families that ren gaged in this. two of these -- two of america's best happen to be from my congressional district in utah, and a number of members obviously care deeply about this issue. you're going to see members coming and going in this hearing. we have lots of different things happening in congress at the same time. some families may claim we have not done enough by not allowing classified or highly graphic information to be discussed today, and others may claim that any discussion about extortion 1-7 is counterprodifbt and opens old wounds. if i did not believe that the majority of the families wanted a forum like this to exist, we would not be conducting this heari
unity force control on the ground. the ukrainian defense chief, according to afp, has said that russia has sent at least 6000 troops to crimea. that is the headline coming out of the af he this morning. about 41 minutes ago. there is a picture of some of the unidentified armed men in front of the crimean parliament. let's go to mark, waiting in massachusetts on our line for independence. -- line for independents. caller: i think russia definitely has a right to protect their interests. they have bases down there. i know the ukrainian government is set up. is there any real military force ? if some he wants to come in and -- do harmia people in the upheaval. it, maybes down to crimea will secede and become their own country. russia today reporting in an interview with the russian dispense -- defense minister that russia has 150,000 troops and 90 aircraft, 800 80 tanks and 1200 pieces of military hardware involved in drills on the ukrainian border right now. that doesn't concern you? host: i didn't know that they had that much stockpile. the do have their whole fleet. strength already hu
heard it again today from the russian defense minister. he maintained that no, there are no russian soldiers occupying crimea as it stands. they maintain this position that they say it is local self-defense teams, local militias, and we only know on the ground what we see and what our own cfn teams have seen. there's some local militias but undoubtedly russian soldiers. not wearing the insignia but heavily armed, driving armored vehicles, some of those vehicles have russian registration plates. very difficult to see how negotiations can proceed when the russian position is just that they have not begun any occupation of ukrainian territory. >> phil black in moscow. as we mentioned at the top of the hour, russia is due to take part in nato's discussion of the cries in ukraine. john kerry is due to meet with his russian counterpart. kerry lamented russian's absence ever his counterparts from great britain and ukraine. >> we have our friends from ukraine and great britain, partners in the budapest agreement of 1994. we're missing one member, hopefully meet this afternoon with that indi
intelligence. who are they all? four of them, the largest are in the defense department. the national security agency which has been in the news a lot. the national geospatial intelligence agency where i worked for a couple of years. they take pictures from satellites. the defense intelligence agency does mostly intelligence matters. then, the national reconnaissance office which manages satellites. and a lot of people think you launch a satellite and it is just up there. no, you fly a satellite. you determine where it will be and then you maintain it. that is what they do. two intelligence agencies focused primarily on the united states. the fbi and the department of homeland security. they're concerned with threats and terrorist organizations and they work with state and local governments. then you have the treasury department. the drug enforcement agency. their work should be obvious. the energy department which is where my security clearance currently resides which looks after nuclear matters and energy matters. we also have each of the five armed forces as its own intelligence branch. you
mainly discuss is defense. it is vital for obvious reasons. at the same time, there is a remarkable positive use of national intelligence. especially at the national intelligence council. it is a group of 100 or 120 academics and intelligence veterans who are very smart and talented. what they do is they analyze. they start with the background of professors that others have in the ad to what they can learn from intelligence. what comes for them is remarkable insight. this is one of the greatest assets the u.s. has. when they can integrate what is on the record with what they learned from intelligence, all of those 16 agencies are available to enable wise decisions. i know the intelligence community did not foresee the decline of the soviet union and do not get the weapons of mass distraction from saddam hussein, but the record overall has been extremely successful. it is a source we do not use enough. one of the basic frustrations is in adequate or in complex -- or incomplete. i work with the current director of national intelligence. a veteran of the intelligence world. he once tur
- china ramps up defense spending as the united states cuts back. >>> three of al jazeera's journalists detained in an egyptian prison make their second court appearance in a few hours. >>> and still looking over venezuela a near after his death - hugo chavez remains part of every day life. [ ♪ music ] >>> hello. world powers usually preoccupied with syria are rapidly flying diplomats around the globe to get to grips with ukraine. the united states and europe have been slated against russia. john kerry and sergei lavrov are due to meet in paris. they are meant to talk about syria, but no doubt ukraine will fig fighture. ukrainian soldiers, meanwhile, have been, in some says forced to choose sides. jennifer glasse reports from sevastopol. >> if there's somewhere where the russians have full control, it's here at sevastopol. ships of the black sea fleet halt all traffic, draining all life from this otherwise thriving port. if the russian's intentions is to take over ukrainian military instillations, it is not over yet. ukrainian servicemen refuse to yield to the russian show of force.
sign up to fight in the nation's defense. the news comes to an army study in risk in service members. stars. it's funded by the army and the national institutes of mental health. three new star today were released this week in the journal of american medical association's psychiatry article. one-half of troops suffered from some form of mental illness before they entered the military. one in five in panic disorder or adhd and one in ten had intermittent explosive disorder, a tendency for anger and sudden rage. this was five times higher than the average rate in the civilian population. it was seen as the most common risk factor for suicide at behavior. in the height of the wars in afghanistan and iraq, between 2004 and 2009, the military suicide rit more than doublinged since the pentagon started tracking the number in 2001. 569 soldier's deaths were ruled suicides during that period. 2012 saw a peak in military suicides, 349 service people taking their own lives. >> we also need to keep improving mental health services. >> at an address in the national convention, president obama
from the head of defense committee who said that the defense committee looked into it, and they unanimously approve the action. there was the head of the foreign affairs committee also saying that they had looked into it, and they were unanimously approving what the president was asking for. we have the deputy speaker of the upper chamber. they were saying there were militants from maidan who were trained in poland and lithuania, and they also called for the russian ambassador from the u.s. to be recalled. they said that yanukovych was still the legitimate head of the ukraine. so the message is absolutely the same from everyone who is speaking at the moment. the vote has not happened yet. we don't know quite how it's going to take, so we will be watching. >> errorrory, it does sound like steps are being taken for some sort of intervention. does it mean that troops will be going into crimea? >> reporter: well, we don't know exactly what it means. the proposal is quite vague. it didn't even specify crimea. it said that military involvement could take place in ukraine. so
was called the western defense zone. so they were we moved -- removed, they were forced to leave, and they were put in camps surrounded by barbed wire, and they were not charged with anything in particular. west coast non-japanese-americans, the population in general, most poll constitutions, most newspapers strongly supported the removal of japanese-americans. it was a very popular policy locally. the civil rights organizations which were largely based back east didn't pay much attention to it. in all of the major jewish newspapers on the west coast, they were weeklies, and they had editorials talking about how the rights of all are to be protected, and we should fight prejudice in all of it forms and so on and so forth without ever saying the word "japanese" specifically, so it was almost as if they wanted to say something but were nervous about actually doing so. so there was, i call it a kind of awkward silence or an uncomfortable silence around this issue that i started to investigate more. >> this weekend booktv and american history tv look behind the history and literary l
of the two military commands and review of the 2015 defense authorization. some of the other topics include nsa surveillance programs and the use of strategic nuclear arsenal. they testified for about two hours and 15 minutes. >> [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. today we begin our annual posturings with the combatant commands by receiving testimony from the u.s. strategic command of the u.s. cyber command, a sub-unified command of the u.s. strategic command. let me welcome admiral cecil haney in his first appearance before the committee as the command of u.s. strategic command, and general keith alexander in what may be his final appearance before the committee as command of the u.s. cyber command. general alexander also serves as we know as director of the national security agency, and when he retires at the end of next month he will by far be the longest-serving nsa director in history, and we thank you both for your extraordinary service. this hearing comes at a time of reduced budgets across the u.s. government, including the department of defense. even though this
to address today how the department of defense and the va handling sexual assault reports impact survivors' mental health. the va's own website says that how the military handles military sexual assault has actually made ptsd worse. quote, many victims are reluctant to report sexual trauma and many victims say that there were no available methods for reporting their experiences to those in authority. many indicate that if they did report the harassment, they were not believed, or encouraged to keep silent about the experience. they may have had their reports ignored. or even worse, have been themselves blamed for the experience. having this type of invalidating experience following a sex seoul trauma is likely to have significant, negative impact on the victim's post-trauma adjustment. end of quote. i'm alarmed by the following statistic, as should every person in this room. on average, 22 veterans commit suicide every single day. 22 brave men and women commit suicide every single day. it's critical that we look at the links between sexual assaults and harassment and related ptsd, and its
the same. what's the point six billion on this are the among put its modernization. why has the defense minister doctor yesterday. the four guys were in the defence ministry the defence that he must resign. the defense minister must design that is that the buck stops being in the knees and pulling the fifteen new organization can just toss the geeky austin and tough kid who becomes weeks has the capacity to getting tickets in spite of jeans but it was oh so unknown that kind met many nice all its most mundane things tossed in for decades. then another question me some lame seemed adoption. it started chemo might getting the team to members. i suspect that the cause of the season with the incidence has more to do it the lack of chocolate eating and eating the treatment. he's called me he summed up on the sky. low ninety eight. he wants a cigarette by a jokey training he got me a gun safety procedures keep me hanging on his work on getting back on a journey he's gay mecca home the key to a ninety minute meeting on the assumption will be some form to be busy week. in each of the novel and
at where the money goes. billion for defense spending. that is what congress have control over's. nondefense, $563 billion. point $9nding is three trillion. 800 $96 billion for social security. 526care eats up about billion dollars. medicaid, 330 6 billion dollars. other mandatory spending comes in at $691 billion. interest on the debt, $252 billion. where the money is race, taxes.ual income 237 billion. other taxes comes to $363 billion. proposal reduces the deficit $564 billion. gail, republican color. -- caller. caller: it is driving the country over the cliff. died over 60 years ago and my mother taught me how to live within my means. this president does not know how to do that. you cannot spend what you do not have. he wants to give money to the -- gals and the you are looking to hurt anyone that does have a little bit. host: tax the rich. that is obama's main theme. where is the job creation atmosphere? budget.it is a good it is what we voted for by reelecting barack obama a second time. budget and it has 651 billion dollars in new revenue from the rich via changes to the
loyalties to the west and loyalties to russia. our defense secretary chuck hagel urging russia to act cautiously, that the u.s. strongly supports ukraine's territorial integrity. we'll watch the story. jon: new he will developments in the social eight murder trial. pamela phillips charged with a plotting a car bombing that killed her husband. coming up, an emotional breakdown in court. >>> remember the anti-muslim filmed once blamed for the deadly terror attacks in benghazi, sparking them? a judge orders them pulled from the internet. the stunning reason why. jenna: welcome back, everyone. a federal appeals court ordering youtube to take down a film from its website over a copyright complaint. it is not just any film. it is the same film the white house originally blamed for sparking the deadly attack on our consulate in benghazi. william la jeunesse live in our l.a. newsroom with more on this. william? >> reporter: jenna, of course that claim by the white house was untrue but now the film president obama wanted off the internet is gone. not because it is anti-muslim but because it vi
to the gym. she was found not guilty. danny, what do you make of the verdict? >> her entire defense was about who she was, a person on her way to work. that context was critical. the only shot she had here. her entire defense was involuntary intoxification. she accidentally took one of these ambiens. that defense hinged on the context. what kind of person was this? i promise you, if the facts were that she was at an applebys at night and she had an ambien, i don't know they would believe that was involuntary intoxification. instead, she was on the way to the gym. who in the world of drug addicts would take an ambien to go to the gym? >> it is a common sense argument. why would you possibly do that? you said it was all about who she is, no the necessarily the kennedy name. the kennedy name did come up, very prominently introduced by the defense. they explained who she was, all about her family. do you think it played any role in being charged and also in the verdict? >> whenever you have a defendant you are putting on the stand, you will do anything to bring out facts that will show they are a
. it prohibits economic coercion. are the guarantors required to come to your defense? >> unfortunately, in history since 1994, the russian federation tried to suppress us with economic tools. we use the arguments of these agreements. it did not work. as we have today, the european union and united states, the guarantors -- they are ready to provide assistance and financial systems. your first question -- we have had no clear answer for my statement. the troops appeared long before the duma took the positions of today. this action has been prepared long before. it was a well-prepared action. that is why my feeling and position is that the provisions of the charter, the mechanisms and principles of the security council were violated severely. they destroyed -- without any consultations with anybody. they decided to protect -- it was a mistake in the statement of one of the colleagues. the decision was taken not to protect the at make russians but the russian speaking population. if you speak russian, you are to be protected by the russian federation. >> because the deputy harry secretary
the ports. and today, they took over two strategic defense areas, defense missile systems. it appears now they control just about everything. well, overnight, united states time, my crew and i flew down to crimea to get a look on the ground and we'll begin where we landed. we arrived at the airport midday. and everything seemed pretty normal. nobody bothering you, nobody asking questions, nobody staring you down in any strange way. the weather much better here than in the north. and then, over here at this gate that leads out of the airport, a man who professes to be a local from simferopol who is volunteering, with volunteer equipment, things that belong to himself, but one difference you might notice here, see the brand-new scotch tape on the fence post here holding up what is a brand-new russian flag. the changes are subtle. they are not in any way oppressive. but they're here. >> i saw the victims for the first time in my life and i was scared. >> she grew up here. last week when the russians arrived, she was frightened. >> i thought that it was the beginning of maybe war and an expec
for their strong support for israel. [applause] for our security, including in the vital area of missile defense. i said that the greatest threat to our common security is that of a nuclear-armed iran. we must prevent iran from having the capability to produce nuclear weapons. and i want to reiterate that point, not just, to prevent them from having the weapon, but to prevent them from having the capacity to make the weapon. [applause] that means we must dismantle iran's heavy water reactor and its underground enrichment facilities. we must get rid of iran's centrifuges and its stockpiles of enriched-uranium and we must that iran fully divulge the military dimensions of its nuclear program. now 17 countries around the world have peaceful nuclear energy programs. they're doing this without spinning centrifuges, without enriching uranium, without operating heavy water facilities, and without conducting military nuclear research. you know why iran insists on doing all of these things that the other peaceful countries don't do? it's because iran doesn't want a peaceful nuclear program. iran wants a mil
this budget request, one fact was front and center. nation's % of the budget, america's defense has never been more vital to our economic prosperity or global leadership. whether in the mideast, ukraine, europe or our own hemisphere, diplomacy is needed now more than ever. investments in diplomacy and development are returned to us in security and jobs. this budget funds the work that is required to sustain long-term investment while regular recognizing the fiscal constraints we face as a nation. details are online, i'll just hit a few highlights here. the overall request is $46.2 billion. the base budget of $40.3 billion is consistent with the f.y. 2014 level this will enable us to carry out our global, dip lo -- ur global diplomatic and other missions, honor our commitments o allies and partners, keep up wur opiece keap -- peacekeeping activities and respond to crises such as the typhoon in the fill peeps. it funds key programs in iraq and afghanistan and helps sustain hard-fought gains in afghanistan. the budget also enables us to respond to the ongoing humanitarian and refugee crisis
plan came in mid-january when the defense minister called kerry messianic. he was strongly condemned to the comments, but his words convey the difficulty ahead. >> doug, thank you. >>> thousands of anti-government activists marched peacefully to venezuela's capital today, trying to maintain that movement's momentum. afterwards, several hundred protesters erected barricades, burned tires and threw rocks and fireworks at national guard troops. they responded with tear gas. it's become a near nightly ritual for about two weeks. two people were e runner oscar pistorius' murder trial is under way in south africa. the olympian pleaded not guilty to murdering his girlfriend. he said he shot reeva steenkamp by mistake last valentine's day, thinking she was an intruder. a witness testified in court today she heard gunshots and blood curdling screams. prosecutors believe the world famous athlete shot his girlfriend after a fight and tried to paint a picture at the trial of a loud argument before the fatal shots. >>> one member of congress gets a fashion makeover. wait until you see why. >>> if
will play out? more money for defense, then rising deficits and then cutbacks on programs that middle class and working families need? absolutely, that is what will happen. >> what is going to happen to these veterans, now, senator, if they're not going to get this kind of funding. there are a lot of veterans in this country that are being undercut, that are not being -- our obligation, we are not living up to our obligations because of war and budget cuts. so what does that say to the next generation thinking of a career in the military? >> that's a very important point. it says if we cannot keep faith with those people really hurting as a result of service to this country, i think you will have a lot of young people out there saying do i really want to make a career in the military? i will tell you this, ed. i didn't know this until i became chairman of the senate veterans committee t. cost of war is enormous. >> yeah. >> you are talking about people whose lives have been shattered. their family's lives have been shattered. their kids' lives have been shattered. and if there is any priori
be linked to what has been going on in ukraine. now the defense minister has said this has nothing to do with what is going on in ukraine. but two of the four military districts are going to be going on several days worth of military drills. now what essentially this amounts to is a testing of the military readiness of those particular districts. it involves some 150,000 armed personnel. it includes some of the baltic naval fleet and includes some of the air force as well. the defense minister says this has been taking place near some of russia's borders, but again, specifically saying this has nothing to do with what is going on in this the yukraine. now although there has been that statement, i think it is probably going through the minds of many people of the russian government that holding military drills at this moment, reminding russian's rivals of russian military might at a time when russia's prestige and influence in central and eastern kru krurp -- europe certainly wouldn't be a bad thing to do. >> rory thank you very much indeed. right now there appear to be two centers to the
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